Last update June 1, 2020

Coffee

Low Risk

Moderately safe. Probably compatible. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

Caffeine is a trimethylxanthine stimulant of the central nervous system found in many infusions (coffee, tea, mate, guarana) in cocoa / chocolate and in cola drinks and in supposedly energy drinks (Barone 1996, Fulton 1990).

Mean Caffeine content (González 2015, Santos 2012):
1 coffee cup: 100 mg, 1 black tea cup: 80 mg, 1 green tea cup: 50 mg, 1 chocolate cup: 5 - 10 mg
1 liter of cola & soda: 100-150 mg, 1 liter of energizers beverages 300 to 800 mg.

Caffeine is excreted in human milk in variable amount (Calvaresi 2016, Stavchansky 1988, Ryu 1985, Bucher 1985, Berlin 1984, Findlay 1981, Tyrala 1979).

Moderate coffee consumption does not produce significant levels of caffeine in plasma or urine of infants, and may be undetectable or below therapeutic levels in the neonatal period (Blanchard 1992, Fulton 1990, Berlin 1984, Hildebrandt 1983, Bailey 1982, Rivera 1977).

Doses greater than 300 - 500 mg of caffeine daily can cause nervousness, irritability and insomnia in the infant (Santos 2012, Martin 2007, Clement 1989, Rustin 1989), as well as decreased iron levels in breast milk and anemia in the infant (Muñoz 1988 ). Also has been related to the Raynaud's phenomenon in the nipple of nursing women (McGuinness 2013).

One study found no problems in infants whose mothers consumed 500 mg of caffeine daily for 5 days (Ryu 1985).
There is insufficient evidence on the recommended amount of caffeine during lactation (McCreedy 2018).

The elimination half-life, of a few hours in adults, can be 10 times longer in preterm infants and during the neonatal period, reaching adult values by 3-5 months of age. (McNamara 2004, Oo 1995).

The moderate use of caffeine during lactation is considered compatible or probably compatible by various experts (Hale 2019, Briggs 2017, Bordini 2016, Davanzo 2014, Rowe 2103).
The American Academy of Pediatrics rates coffee compatible with breastfeeding (AAP 2001).


See below the information of these related products:

  • Caffeine (Moderately safe. Probably compatible. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.)
  • Guarana (Moderately safe. Probably compatible. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.)
  • Mate ( Safe. Compatible. Minimal risk for breastfeeding and infant.)
  • Tea (Moderately safe. Probably compatible. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.)
  • Theobromine ( Safe. Compatible. Minimal risk for breastfeeding and infant.)

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Coffee.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM team, and are based on updated scientific publications. It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Coffee is also known as


Coffee in other languages or writings:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Coffee in its composition:

Pharmacokinetics

Variable Value Unit
Oral Bioavail. 100 %
Molecular weight 194 daltons
Protein Binding 10 - 36 %
VD 0,6 l/Kg
Tmax 0,5 - 2 hours
T1/2 5 (3 - 7) hours
M/P ratio 0,1 - 0,8 -
Theoretical Dose 0,15 - 2,4 mg/Kg/d
Relative Dose 4 - 19 %
Ped.Relat.Dose 1,5 - 48 %

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