Last update: June 11, 2016

Aloe barbadensis

Low Risk for breastfeeding


Moderately safe. Probably compatible.
Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended.
Read the Comment.

Herb leaves are used. It contains hydroxianthracenes, acemannan and glycomannan.

Attributed properties: laxative and healing effect on wounds.

Indication according to Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: constipation.

Excessive or long-term use may lead to severe diarrhea, dehydration and liver toxicity.

At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found.
As an active laxative compound it can lead to colicky abdominal pain. Because excretion into breast milk is possible, avoiding it while breastfeeding is advisable.

Non-toxic when topically used.

Without proof of efficacy it is used to treat nipple's crackles or pain. If applied on the breast, cleanse it thoroughly before nursing to avoid swallowing by the infant. Risk of diarrhea or refusing to latch-on because of bad taste would increase.

Alternatives

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Aloe barbadensis is Aloe in Latin, botanical name.

Is written in other languages:

Aloe barbadensis is also known as

Groups

Aloe barbadensis belongs to these groups or families:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Aloe barbadensis in its composition:

References

  1. Meng S, Deng Q, Feng C, Pan Y, Chang Q. Effects of massage treatment combined with topical cactus and aloe on puerperal milk stasis. Breast Dis. 2015 Abstract
  2. Abu Hamad BA, Sammour HK. Weaning practices of mothers attending United Nations Relief and Works Agency health centres in the Gaza Governorates. J Adv Nurs. 2013 Abstract
  3. Sim TF, Sherriff J, Hattingh HL, Parsons R, Tee LB. The use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding: a population-based survey in Western Australia. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Bunchorntavakul C, Reddy KR. Review article: herbal and dietary supplement hepatotoxicity. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. The Royal Women’s Hospital Victoria Australia. Herbal and Traditional Medicines in Breasfeeding. Fact Sheet. 2013 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. Mannion C, Mansell D. Breastfeeding self-efficacy and the use of prescription medication: a pilot study. Obstet Gynecol Int. 2012;2012:562704. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  7. Amir LH, Pirotta MV, Raval M. Breastfeeding--evidence based guidelines for the use of medicines. Aust Fam Physician. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  8. Cuzzolin L, Francini-Pesenti F, Verlato G, Joppi M, Baldelli P, Benoni G. Use of herbal products among 392 Italian pregnant women: focus on pregnancy outcome. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 Abstract
  9. Zhang AL, Story DF, Lin V, Vitetta L, Xue CC. A population survey on the use of 24 common medicinal herbs in Australia. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2008 Abstract
  10. Zaffani S, Cuzzolin L, Benoni G. Herbal products: behaviors and beliefs among Italian women. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Abstract
  11. Barankin B, Gross MS. Nipple and areolar eczema in the breastfeeding woman. J Cutan Med Surg. 2004 Abstract
  12. De Smet PA. Health risks of herbal remedies: an update. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Abstract
  13. Larimore WL, Petrie KA. Drug use during pregnancy and lactation. Prim Care. 2000 Abstract
  14. Kopec K. Herbal medications and breastfeeding. J Hum Lact. 1999 Jun;15(2):157-61. Review. No abstract available. Abstract
  15. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume I. WHO monographs 1999 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)

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